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The Perfect CRM – Part II

This really is not so much a continuation of my last posting as it is a follow up discussion answering a few of the questions I received.

For those who read my last offering, you are aware that it was part of a unique ‘blog blast’ that I was privileged to have been a part of…six A/E/C marketplace bloggers all writing on the same topic, the perfect CRM.

My own take was to approach it from the perspective of using a CRM to manage leads, prospects and customers for building new business. I gave a little background on my history of working in the construction information business for 13 years and seeing how companies use and ‘misused’ the leads they purchased.

Allow me to steer off topic for just a bit and address the subject of paying for leads and say that Reed Construction Data, McGraw-Hill’s F.W. Dodge Reports, Construction Wire, CDC News, etc. are all good at what they do. I have used or consulted with companies using all of these and more and the main point I would like to make is that as helpful and useful as these leads are, the chances of their ‘uniqueness’ are slim to none. What I mean by that is, chances are, dozens and in some cases hundreds of your competitors are using the very same leads.

The difference is how one utilizes the information in those leads. Very much the same way I could play Phil Keaggy’s guitar or hit a few balls with Tiger’s driver, but the results would be much different. It is the old ‘where do you put the fulcrum for your lever?’ idea.

Now, on to the questions:

Q: How do I get ‘buy-in’ from my employees who I know are going to resist a new CRM system?

A: Well, there is always the “I am the general, you are the private, I out-rank you so do it!” approach, which I do not recommend as the initial presentation. This is simply nothing more than following the old business adage, “If you get them to help plan the fight, the less likely they are to fight the plan.”

This will require a much better understanding of what a CRM can do that your future users. This is where you, the boss, play the role of the consultant with your sales reps as your client. Most CRM’s are customizable and have more features than the average user will come close to using. Start by asking what their challenges are in tracking prospects, making sure you follow the shortest path from ‘stranger’ to loyal customer. Get their input from the beginning, hold round-table discussions, let them participate in the sales presentation from the vendor.

Q: We have employees all over the country, what challenges should I be aware of before implementing a CRM?

A: Easy…standards! This is what I call “Making the ‘Big-Mac’ taste the same.” What I mean by that is, if you buy a Big-Mac in Albuquerque, it will taste just like a Big-Mac you would buy in Atlanta. Make sure you develop standards for entry and use that are easy to understand and help you reach the goals you have set for implementing or upgrading your CRM.

Q: What do I need from a CRM?

A: This is a very open question but important because, depending upon one’s knowledge of and understanding of a CRM, it can be very easy to over or under buy. I worked with one company that spent several hundred, thousand dollars on a system that would take a lead or prospect information and weave it through their accounting, human resources and operations.

The system is very, very robust and if used properly can save a company tons of money. However, in this case, it was the equivalent of trying to kill a fly with a stick of dynamite. A good sales rep can make any CRM look like the best thing since penicillin so spend some time and effort understanding what you need and how you will use it before you begin your purchasing process.

Q: What is the biggest mistake a company makes in investing in a CRM?

A: Believing that purchasing a CRM is a ‘silver bullet’. I have said it before that the purchase alone of a CRM is much like the purchase of a ‘Bow-flex’…the purchase alone will do nothing for you. What will make a difference is the effective and continued use of one will.

In closing, I will admit that all of this plays well into my ‘healthy level of OCD’. And, yes, I admit that when it comes to discussing CRM’s, data standards, feature comparisons, execution plans, etc. the real inner geek in me comes alive but that is because of all my years in business, I have seen fewer programs that can help a company build new business and grow than a well-executed CRM system.

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Bobby Darnell is the founder and Principal of Construction Market Consultants, Inc. An Atlanta based management consulting group specializing in business development, sales, marketing and profitability as well as executive placement for the Architectural, Engineering and Construction industry.

Bobby can be reached at bobbydarnell [at] cmconl.com

www.cmconl.com

About the Author

Bobby Darnell is the founder and Principal of Construction Market Consultants, Inc., An Atlanta based management consulting group specializing in CRM, Business Development, Sales, Marketing as well as Executive Placement and Recruiting for the Architectural, Engineering and Construction industry.

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